Thursday, March 15, 2007

Perdre

The french verb 'to lose'.

Well it's Thursday and I'm in that dark quagmire once more; this is getting tedious, I know.
I am 17 years and nine months old, today; roughly.

6 comments:

Awareness said...

Better perdre than perdu. RIGHT?!


We're walking with you sweetie.


I'm 46 (f*** I can't believe I'm 46) and six months......

I distinctly remember being 17 and 9 months. i was in London having a turn at the speaker's corner. Honest to God! I was in London touring around at that point in my life!

Rainbow dreams said...

Niki, hi and hugs,

I can't say I'd want to be back at 17 again... take care, things can and do change

thinking of you, Katie, x

Niki said...

Definitely D; better to lose than to be lost.

At my 17 years and 9 month point I am sitting at a desk flirting with the german concierge...

Hi Katie, hugs to you too, thanks x

Awareness said...

Now that's a good thing. Can't ever be lost flirting.... :)

mister tumnus said...

ok excuse my exceptionally limited knowledge of any language (including my own at times); does the verb mean 'to lose' as in 'to lose something' (like an object or a person or someone's love) or does it mean 'to lose' as in the opposite of 'to win' (to lose a game of monopoly or to be a loser, even).

it seems to me like you have lost in the first sense- like maybe you have lost something precious to you. but someone who struggles so openly and who keeps trying and coming back to 'i'm tired of this' but who has not completely given up on herself cannot be called a loser, IMHO.

Niki said...

Mr T; as is typical of the french it means lose in every sense of the word, I'm afraid.